Bodies of water, oceans of emotions

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Making connections with the body of water
This project is an open call for artists, makers, thinkers, poets, and anyone else who wants to contribute to the conversation about emotions and climate change. We want to highlight the personal perspectives of indigenous, living at the frontlines, and experiencing climate change problems every day. Contributions will be selected based on their aim of filling an alternative narrative of emotionally relatable climate context information. Personal stories, honoring voices, and attention toward the emotional effects of climate change. Our goal is to make a nonexhaustive selection of a big picture of water-related issues that we think are relevant to mention in this format of zine curation and publishing.

Emocean is an experimental zine-publication with a factual and poetic approach to the information it prints. It focuses on spotlighting stories unheard by those living in concrete jungles, honors voices, and focuses on the emotional effects of climate change. A project similar to ours is the magazine Atmos, which explores the influence of climate change on culture. They say culture can’t exist without climate and that is why it is important to look at the two together. It is a biannual magazine and digital platform curated by an ecosystem of adventurers, creatives, and journalists dedicated to pioneering progress around the world. (“atmos” Is a New Magazine Bridging the Gap between Culture and Climate, 2019)

We are collecting content. Not academic but especially for curated edited issues and magazines We want submissions to fill an alternative narrative of emotionally relatable climate context information. Personal stories, honoring voices, and attention toward the emotional effects of climate change. Our goal is to make a nonexhaustive selection of a big picture of water-related issues that we think are relevant to mention in this format of zine curation and publishing.

There is no doubt that climate change as well as grief and other emotions around it are points of interest in pop-culture/media coverage. Currently, it has returned in a wide presence of articles about climate grief, social media storms about climate guilt, trends around sustainability, and indigenous speaking out and demonstrating about water governance and climate change - showing the seriousness of the effects of climate change. The thing that we like to call climate depression or eco-anxiety often disregards the life conditions of the human and nonhuman living at the frontlines. The amount of ecological devastation the manufacturing and extraction of sources do to the bodies of water on our earth. This new age awareness and depression of what is happening to the environment around us mixes a variety of practices from far-reaching geo-zones often as an aesthetic addition to Western life. Moreover, in its focus on consumerism, it seems to be our version of the Great Depression. Such a depression focused on the negative effects of climate impact, humans still tend to not look outside their personal context. Neglecting the people outside the west, living at the frontlines of the problem. Promising sustainability trends that still don’t require halting consumption, brands promise you that by buying a more “sustainable” product you don’t contribute to the problem. In return for an investment of capital, green consumerism promises, the myriad benefits of such sustainable products can be ours.

What is the problem? We are consuming all of the world and everything and we neglect indigenous people that are living here. We claim that we are so depressed about climate change and about what is going on in the world and how we see this in the news every day. However, we do not look further than our own horizon, our own bias. We see ourselves, we want to consume, we don’t want to take a step back in consumption or give power to those that we need to repay our power debts to since colonization started. We live in our own bubbles of bias. With Emocean we want to show perspectives and stories of people and individuals living at the frontlines, we want to activate our readers to look beyond their own perspectives and biases. We have the privilege of living so far away from the visible problem that we look elsewhere to fund our depression. This all happens every day while indigenous everywhere are struggling to keep their land and water healthy because of capitalist industries polluting and destroying the very ecosystems that they call their home.

In the twenty-first century, we have witnessed a steady increase in interest in climate change and its influence on culture around the world. Who are different makers and thinkers in this field? Who are different makers, thinkers, and doers in this field that influenced the path we took with the project?

Atmos is an exploration of climate and culture, a biannual magazine and digital platform curated by an ecosystem of adventurers, creatives, and journalists dedicated to pioneering progress around the world.

Autumn Peltier: Autumn Peltier is a water defender who began her fight for indigenous Canadians’ right to clean drinking water when she was only eight years old.

350 climate org - pacific regions pacific climate warriors Every morning, we wake up and the ocean is there, surrounding our island. But now the ocean, driven by climate change is creeping ever closer. Unless something changes, many of our Pacific Islands face losing everything to sea-level rise. For 20 years we’ve asked world leaders to take action to stop polluting the atmosphere. We cannot wait longer. Now, warriors of the Pacific are rising peacefully to protect the Pacific Islands from climate change. Our message: We are not drowning. We are fighting.

Kevin Aipopo: strong winds poem

First nations Canada - indigenous in Canada The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is a national advocacy organization representing First Nation citizens in Canada, which includes more than 900,000 people living in 634 First Nation communities and in cities and towns across the country.

Mni Wiconi: stand with standing rock

Dasia Gall: emotions about water:

{{I feel so connected and grateful for everything the ocean has given me. It’s given me a purpose, and a way of life. It’s given me the chance to channel my ancestors and live a life as they did. My people have songs and dances and celebrations just for the ocean, and they’ve been celebrating it for over 7,000 years.}}

Save the blue environmental foundation: The mission of the H2oover Environmental foundation is to undertake and support campaigns necessary for advancing public understanding of and solutions for water conservation issues. SAVE THE BLUE is the foundation's call to action: marine and aquatic habitats, that we and other organisms depend on for life, are severely degraded, polluted, and overfished worldwide, leading to serious human health issues.

Blue Gold: World Water Wars Synopsis. Blue Gold: World Water Wars examines environmental and political implications of the planet's dwindling water supply and posits that wars in the future will be fought over water. The film also highlights some success stories of water activists around the world.

Midnight oil - poem - Oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico: this leads to the rigs to reefs program which is actually greenwashing for a big part. All the good things that they say they influence are only good for the wallet of the organization and for the oil rigging companies. Not for marine conservation or general marine life. (Oil spills are then also an influence)

Birgitta Jónsdóttir is an Icelander with international name recognition. Perhaps best known to the rest of the world for creating the Pirate Party in Iceland and her involvement with WikiLeaks, her history with Icelanders actually stretches back decades before that. She has used her talent and boundless energy to create projects ranging from poetry, activism, media reform and politics. Her uncompromising approach to everything she does draws supporters and detractors of equal passion


Through the performance of indigenous beliefs and nature laws, we can explore the arts of living on a damaged planet. Respecting the boundaries and sacredness of the water that we are all dependent on. By standing for and giving voices to bodies of water, poets and artists make room to build bridges to the nonhuman. By sharing stories of personal emotion of people living at the frontlines of the problem and of those who feel spiritually impacted by the hurting of the nonhuman, there is more context to connect to. The knowledge is there but we need individuals to look further than their own environment to see what we need to do to survive on this sacred planet. Through decolonial listening, we can pay our respects to those who have been oppressed for so long and who hold the knowledge to nurture our mother earth. The thing is that because colonists have been claiming land all around the world since about forever; Now is the time that all these climate issues are arising, that are still the effects of colonization Now is the time that the indigenous need a place around the table for these climate issues We are advocating for a place for these voices. To be there, so that they can be present in the conversation and are no longer neglected or overheard.

This project is an open call for artists, makers, thinkers, poets, and anyone else who wants to contribute to the conversation about emotions and climate change. We want to highlight the personal perspectives of indigenous, living at the frontlines, and experiencing climate change problems every day. Contributions will be selected based on their aim of filling an alternative narrative of emotionally relatable climate context information. Personal stories, honoring voices, and attention toward the emotional effects of climate change. Our goal is to make a nonexhaustive selection of a big picture of water-related issues that we think are relevant to mention in this format of zine curation and publishing.

Conclusion: There are so many ways to talk about environmental themes, Emocean is a zine magazine that wants to add the personal emotional level to this. We want to make actual indigenous voices louder and in this way contribute to giving them a seat at the table about climate discussions. People like me, people like you, should know about these things happening and that’s why we are writing about them in EmOcean. We want our readers to be able to connect to the things that we are writing, activating them to use their voice to make someone else’s louder.

References: “atmos” is a new magazine bridging the gap between culture and climate. (2019, April 23). I-d. https://i-d.vice.com/en_uk/article/wjv5e5/atmos-magazine-climate-change

Atwood, M. (2020, April 16). Margaret Atwood: It’s the Best of Times, It’s the Worst of Times. Make the Most of It. Time. https://time.com/collection/finding-hope-coronavirus-pandemic/5820595/margaret-atwood-coronavirus-uncertainty/

Black Dog Institute. (2020, May 4). Depression treatment information. https://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/resources-support/depression/treatment/

Blazenhoff, R. (2020, September 17). “My Octopus Teacher” is an extraordinary, must-watch documentary. Boing Boing. https://boingboing.net/2020/09/17/my-octopus-teacher-is-an-e.html

Burgo, J. (2013, May 30). The Difference Between Guilt and Shame. Psychology Today. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/shame/201305/the-difference-between-guilt-and-shame

By Staff Writer. (2020, March 25). What Does the Ocean Symbolize? Reference.Com. https://www.reference.com/world-view/ocean-symbolize-ea51fa147c27050a

CBC News. (2019, September 28). Water protector Autumn Peltier speaks at UN. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OusN4mWmDKQ&ab_channel=CBCNews

Cockburn, P. (2020, August 19). Climate grief expected to be widespread soon but it’s still not openly acknowledged. ABC News. https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2020-08-19/the-danger-of-climate-grief-lies-in-the-fact-its-often-ignored/12563930 DeviMultimedia.com. (2013). SaveTheBlue.org. H2oover Environmental Foundation. http://www.savetheblue.org/articles-dumping-old-drilling-rigs-into-the-ocean.html

FAO. (2018, August 8). A violet chair to give indigenous women a seat at the table. Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations. http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/1147736/icode/

Fontaine, A. S. (2018, April 20). The Creator: Iceland’s Birgitta Jónsdóttir On Poetry, Politics, And The Future. The Reykjavik Grapevine. https://grapevine.is/mag/feature/2018/04/20/the-creator-icelands-birgitta-jonsdottir-on-poetry-politics-and-the-future/

Grøn, L., & Mattingly, C. (2018, February 6). In search of the good old life: Ontological breakdown and responsive hope at the margins of life. Taylor & Francis. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07481187.2017.1396409

Human Rights Watch. (2020, May 27). Make it Safe. https://www.hrw.org/report/2016/06/07/make-it-safe/canadas-obligation-end-first-nations-water-crisis

Insider, W. (2020, March 24). 20 Trends for the 2020s. WGSN Insider. https://www.wgsn.com/blogs/20-trends-for-the-2020s/

Karma, R. (2020, March 28). Coronavirus, anxiety, and the profound failure of rugged individualism. Vox. https://www.vox.com/2020/3/28/21196268/coronavirus-johann-hari-lost-connections-anxiety-depression-failure-rugged-individualism

Lott, T. (2017, November 28). What does depression feel like? Trust me – you really don’t want to know. The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/19/depression-awareness-mental-illness-feel-like

NAAEE. (2018, September 10). Autumn Peltier. https://naaee.org/about-us/people/autumn-peltier

Nugent, C. (2019, November 21). Terrified of Climate Change? You Might Have Eco-Anxiety. Time. https://time.com/5735388/climate-change-eco-anxiety/

Ortiz, D. A. (2020, January 10). Is it wrong to be hopeful about climate change? BBC Future. https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200109-is-it-wrong-to-be-hopeful-about-climate-change

Pihkala, P. (2020, April 3). Climate grief: How we mourn a changing planet. BBC Future. https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200402-climate-grief-mourning-loss-due-to-climate-change

Rich, N. (2018, August 1). Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change. The New York Times Company. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/08/01/magazine/climate-change-losing-earth.html

Rogers, J. (2017, June 1). Seats at the Table: Our Voices Need to be Heard. NITV. https://www.sbs.com.au/nitv/article/2017/06/01/seats-table-our-voices-need-be-heard

Scher, A. (2019, February 14). “Climate grief”: The growing emotional toll of climate change. NBC News. https://www.nbcnews.com/health/mental-health/climate-grief-growing-emotional-toll-climate-change-n946751

Stand With Standing Rock. (2016, November 15). Mni Wiconi. https://standwithstandingrock.net/mni-wiconi/

Taylor, M., & Murray, J. (2020, February 10). ‘Overwhelming and terrifying’: the rise of climate anxiety. The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/feb/10/overwhelming-and-terrifying-impact-of-climate-crisis-on-mental-health

Teachik. (2019, January 6). Slam Poetry – Alice Eather. Teach Indigenous Knowledge. https://teachik.com/slam-poetry-alice-eather/

Thomson Reuters Foundation. (2015, January 21). For indigenous voices in land use, a seat at the table isn’t necessarily enough. News.Trust.Org. https://news.trust.org/item/20150121013714-z9s8d/

Turner, A. (2012, October 24). Honouring Water. Assembly of First Nations. https://www.afn.ca/honoring-water/

WA. (2019, September 5). Giving Aboriginal communities a genuine seat at the table. Wa.Gov.Au. https://www.wa.gov.au/government/announcements/giving-aboriginal-communities-genuine-seat-the-table

weknowyourdreams. (n.d.). The meaning and symbolism of the word - «Ocean». Weknowyourdreams.Com/Ocean. Retrieved November 10, 2020, from http://weknowyourdreams.com/ocean.html WGSN. (2020, October 27). White Paper - The Value Shift — What’s next? White Paper - The Value Shift. https://createtomorrowwgsn.com/2110643-wp-the-value-shift/3/ Wikipedia contributors. (2020a, April 19). Non-human. Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-human Woodward, F. (2020, December 14). Matagi Mālohi: Strong Winds. Vimeo. https://vimeo.com/461590874

Young, K. (2019, November 27). The Rise of Green Consumerism: What do Brands Need to Know? GWI. https://blog.globalwebindex.com/chart-of-the-week/green-consumerism/

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